These Are DreamWrecks!

Underwater artists Dominique Serafini and Cathy Salisbury have captured some of the most spectacular shipwrecks of the world. Their paintings, illustrations and photographs tell the stories of these sunken vessels, transformed under the sea into artificial reefs and shelters for marine life. Below are the stories of the wrecks of Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao, taken from their book about the region. As this website develops, you will see stories of shipwrecks from all across the Caribbean, the Mediterranean and the South Pacific, where Dominique and Cathy have continued their adventures.

These Are DreamWrecks!

Underwater artists Dominique Serafini and Cathy Salisbury have captured some of the most spectacular shipwrecks of the world. Their paintings, illustrations and photographs tell the stories of these sunken vessels, transformed under the sea into artificial reefs and shelters for marine life. Below are the stories of the wrecks of Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao, taken from their book about the region. As this website develops, you will see stories of shipwrecks from all across the Caribbean, the Mediterranean and the South Pacific, where Dominique and Cathy have continued their adventures.

The Bianca C, Grenada
In October 1961, 362 cruise ship passengers found themselves on the docks of St George, Grenada, in their pyjamas, wondering what had happened to their Caribbean cruise.
The Roraima, Martinique
Even though the lionfish have replaced the sailors and passengers, their phantoms still haunt this dramatic wreck that sank in 1902.
The Nahoon, Martinique
Upright with two of the three masts and rigging in place, it is a wonderful and surrealist sight! It appears like the Nahoon has continued it’s sail-worthy journey into another world.
The Tamaya, Martinique
In 1902, the eruption of Mount Pelée devastated the city of Saint-Pierre in Martinique. With 33,000 deaths, this natural disaster is one of the most deadly in the history of mankind. All the ships at anchor in the bay sunk, creating a shipwreck graveyard at the bottom of the sea. The last to be discovered was the mysterious Tamaya.
The Windjammer, Bonaire
In December 1912, a three-mast clipper named the Mairi Bahn arrived on the island of Bonaire. Little did the captain know that this would be her final port of call.
The Hilma Hooker, Bonaire
Start with a beautiful Caribbean coral reef. Add some crystal-clear water, a bunch of bandits and a cargo of Colombian contraband. Stir well. The result—an intriguing episode in Bonairian dive history and a wreck called the Hilma Hooker.
Our Confidence, Bonaire
Upright, intact and home to goliath groupers, angelfish, moray eels, barracudas and schools of fish.
Spelonk Wrecks, Bonaire
If you’re not afraid of the wind and the current, try your luck on the windward side of Bonaire for some of the lesser-known shipwrecks and other surprises.
Hotel Alley Wrecks, Bonaire
Sometimes small wrecks are enough of a shelter to attract marine life, making for fantastic diving.
The Galleon Fleet, Las Aves
Forty miles east of Bonaire, a large semi-submerged coral reef faintly peeps above the surface of the sea. This very dangerous and practically invisible reef has been known for centuries as a navigational trap. In its coral clutches lie the remains of an expedition by the French that could have changed the destiny of the southern Caribbean.
The Antilla, Aruba
Beneath the surface of the clear Caribbean Sea, close to the spectacular white sand beaches of Aruba, sleep some fabulous historic shipwrecks. The wreck of the Antilla serves as a testimony to the tumultuous past of this beautiful island, dating back to the Second World War.
The Jane Sea, Aruba
Among the wrecks that have been sunk for the pleasure of divers are the Jane Sea, the Debby II and the Star Gerren. Aruba’s celebrity from wreck diving is clearly deserved with ships like these making up the diving menu.
Plane Wreck, Aruba
This airplane wreck is surreal - it rests on its landing gear and has its nose pointing in the air, as though it is ready to take off for open water from the coral reef.
The Superior Producer, Curaçao
The Superior Producer was not a glorious military frigate or a proud sailing vessel. It was a boat with a simple purpose and no real story—until one Christmas when it sunk.
Seaquarium Tugboats, Curaçao
A pair of tugboats with beautiful orange cup coral awaits you at the bottom of the Seaquarium wall in Curaçao.
Little Tug, Curaçao
Curaçao is truly the island of tugboat wrecks. There’s the Saba tugboat, the Seaquarium barges, the Vaersen Bay barge… and still, one even more popular one.
Car Pile, Curaçao
If you’ve ever dreamed of simultaneously diving and driving, this is the place for you.
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